Empath Series: Death or how it affects Empaths? – Part 1


English: A graveyard in Tokyo. The boards behi...

I’ve covered this subject before, but there are people, who from time to time, find this article and have told me they’ve found it useful.

I thought I’d post what I’ve previously written here for those who have not read it yet.

This is a channeled conversation with the answers indented in italics.

Tell me about the empath and death.

You mean how the empath views death and how they are affected by it?

Yes.

When we are talking about death, it should be made clear that death is a transition from one state to another. Death does not mean you cease to exist.

What makes death so traumatic is the perception and illusion that those you love ceases to exist. What is left behind is a shell that once was animated by a soul. The body is no longer animated with the essence of that life.

For the empath, this will be traumatic on several levels.

If they were close to the departed soul, they will feel their energies still mixed in with departed one(s), and the shifting and breaking of energies will be extremely traumatic.  This is the pain many loved ones feel when they are suddenly and often unexpectedly separated from their partner.

Also, they face a change in reality, which they are not prepared for. Their world is no longer balanced, nor is it making any sense. As much as they wish it to make sense, it won’t, at least not right away.

Another level is the guilt that they often experience when someone departs. Even though there is nothing they could have done, many empaths feel responsible for when someone dies. How could they have stopped it? Should they have seen warning signs or had a feeling that something bad was about to go down?

This is especially true when suicide is involved, or if someone had a fatal accident. The ‘what if’s’, and ‘why didn’t I?’, and ‘if only I had’ thoughts come up and torment the mind and soul.

Then there is the pain of other people. For an empath, this is just as devastating as they are not only coping with their own pain and grief, but also from those around them.

This is also true for those who did not know the deceased. Going to a funeral for an empath can be quite traumatic as they can be bombarded with many feelings of loss and sorrow.

The reason why death is so hard in our current society is because we have it all tossed around, and the perspectives and understanding are often incorrect.

Death, as many know, and many more begin to know, does not exist. Nor do things such as accidents or untimely deaths truly exist.

The soul is never in the wrong place at the wrong time. It is never unaware of what is occurring from its astral levels.

The biggest question people face is ‘why’? Why did they leave me? Why did this have to happen?

That’s a reasonable question. I’m sure many have asked that and seen no rhyme or reason in many deaths. I know I’m left scratching my head about one or two.

That is because you do not know what was intended on a soul level, nor how one’s passing will affect those left behind. There is a much bigger picture involved here. The very act of someone passing can spark events and changes that may not have happened otherwise or even prevent undesirable ones from occurring.

The people who are meant to be in your life, are in your life, and that is not by random chance. Whether they touch a life for a moment or a lifetime will depend on what is needed and agreed to.

Does that make the loss of a loved one any less painful? No, it doesn’t  It takes a very high level of connection and psychic awareness for one not to feel that loss, and indeed, see it as an opportunity.

If you look back on the deaths you have had in your life, you’ll see how vital they were to your own growth and your own path.

Next: Part 2 – The why.

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One thought on “Empath Series: Death or how it affects Empaths? – Part 1

  1. Pingback: Empathy | The Mana'o Blog

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