The many signs of being an Empath – You are not alone.


PsiZone log revamp from Ted

You may think you’re crazy or just oversensitive, but you might be really an Empath.

Often referred to as HSP or Highly Sensitive People, the Empath will pick up on the feelings and emotions of others around them as though it were their own feelings.

They are not the stuff of science fiction and they are way more common than you think.

You may be one… and not even know it.

Knowing you are an Empath can change your life.

There are many signs that you are empath and here are just a few. As I remember them or note new ones,

This is an ever expanding post. I will continue to add them to this list.

  1. You care too much about other people, even to your own detriment.
  2. Strangers will tell you their life story and say: I don’t know why I am telling you, but I feel I can. They also tend to offload their problems onto you and you may be too polite to tell them to stop.
  3. You will feel lonely, even when around others. The sense of loneliness of being an Empath doesn’t come from being alone, it comes from not being able to talk to others about what you are feeling and feeling there are no answers to your questions.
  4. You may suffer from attention deficit disorder. (ADD) You may easily get drawn into feelings and emotions that come up seemingly randomly. Next thing you know, you are somewhere else and you’ve lost track of what was going on.
  5. If you are naturally psychic, being an Empath will give you additional information about places, people and events.
  6. When someone else has a bad day, you have a bad day in sympathy.
  7. You take on guilt very easily, even for things that you did not do.
  8. You will do anything to keep the peace. Any tension will make you feel very stressed and you can’t relax until everyone else is happy.
  9. Even if you enjoy a particular activity, you won’t enjoy it if the people around you are not into it. You would rather do it on your own or something else.
  10. You can’t bear to see other people or animals in suffering or in pain.
  11. You can always tell when someone is lying. You are a human lie detector.
  12. You find it very difficult to say ‘no’ when someone asks you for help. Many Empaths get treated like a doormat. They don’t want to upset others or make them feel bad by refusing help
  13. You like giving surprise gifts and making others happy just for the sake of it. If they feel good, you feel good, even if it’s just for that moment.
  14. You suffer from anxiety for no apparent reason. Sometimes the feelings will be overwhelming, especially when something major is going on in the world. Stock market crashes are often a bad time for Empaths.
  15. You suffer from clinical depression and mood swings and have no idea why.
  16. You often feel overwhelmed by events and emotions, sometimes to the point where you short out and stop feeling anything at all.
  17. Holidays, such as Christmas, are a very bad time for you. You often feel sad and lonely.
  18. You will always give the benefit of the doubt to someone, just in case they really didn’t mean to say or do something you consider hurtful or negative.
  19. You may suffer from seasonal depression. Autumn might make you feel especially depressed.
  20. You might find you are very psychic, picking up on people and events before they even happen.
  21. You suffer from social anxiety and find it hard to be around people, especially if you feel you shouldn’t be there. Parties are hard and tedious and nightclubs are like a living hell for you.
  22. You want to save the world, but feel too depressed and despondent to do it.
  23. If you hear of someone who is having a hard time, or is unlucky in life or love, you want to just save them and make them happy.
  24. You cry when watching romantic movies, even if they are really bad ones, and you feel embarrassed about doing so.
  25. Old songs make you sad. You long for those past times, even if they were horrible at the time.
  26. You just know things. Even things that no one has never told you. You don’t know how you know them, but you just do.
  27. You don’t know where your feelings end and others begins. You may not even be aware that they are not your feelings.
  28. If someone tells you about their pain or sickness, you will sympathy pains.
  29. You feel constantly exhausted. Chronic fatigue is a reoccurring problem for you.
  30. You are drawn to new age things, especially alternative medicines.
  31. You are extremely creative, though you may feel embarrassed about sharing that part of you in case others reject it or make fun of it.
  32. You may well feel at one with nature. Cities are very hard to live in due to all the psychic pollution that is about.
  33. You are always seeking knowledge. You may not even know what you are looking for, but you look for it anyway.
  34. You daydream a lot. Go on adventures in your mind. This can happen anywhere and anytime.
  35. You can sense the energy of food. You can tell if it feels healthy or not. You are also drawn to bad foods that make you feel good, such as chocolate or sugary treats.
  36. People may consider you strange, aloof or indifferent.
  37. You may have difficulty urinating in public, especially if you feel under pressure. If someone is waiting, you will give up and try to find a place that isn’t being used.
  38. You attract sociopaths and narcissists into your life that will use and abuse you. They will convince you that you are the one who is wrong.

When people find out they are an empath, they ask: How do I know I am one? Generally, only an Empath will ask that type of question. Non Empaths do not care.

If you find yourself nodding along to the above traits, then yes, you are certainly and Empath. The good news is there is so much you can do about it. You can turn what so many call a curse into a blessing.

Help and resources are at hand and they need not cost you a cent.

The free Empath Guidebook was written especially for the Empath and can be downloaded from empathsupport.com

You can also join the Facebook group which focuses on resources and community.  https://www.facebook.com/groups/empathsupport/

If you want to connect to other Empaths and spiritual people in real time, you can try the chat room. http://www.psi-zone.net/oldchat.html

You are not alone.

Guest post: People Who Have Struggled With Addiction Talk About Turning Their Lives Around


gust-post

Today’s post is from a lady called Christina Underwood who asked if I’d post something she wrote in regards to addiction.

Life is a beautiful thing. Addiction can quickly cloud that fact, but when a person is able to get the help that they need, it doesn’t take as long as they think to gain that perspective back. This is clear from the many stories I’ve listened to from recovering addicts. Hope may seem lost, but as the proverbial smoke clears, many realize that things aren’t so bad after all.

Jarakah, a 23-year-old woman from Battle Mountain, Nevada, who attended the Michigan treatment center A Forever Recovery, said her treatment “completely” changed her life and helped her “take a negative idea and turn it into a positive one immediately.”

“My thinking process is different,” she said, adding, “It’s absolutely amazing how different I feel, how prepared I am to go out into the world and how excited I am to start my life.”

Matt, who started drinking at 15, put it this way: “What’s 45 days of your life? You can come here, and if you don’t like it, you can go home. The drinks and the drugs will always still be there. I can say a lot of people would do anything to have a seat here. And I’m just grateful I took it. It just completely changed my life around.”

Ryan from Ohio was a drug user for 9 years (including a 4-to-5 year stint with heroin).

He said, “When you’re in [treatment], you’re kind of in a bubble getting to learn the tools you need to address your life. I’m happy that I get to go home to my family. I’m happy that I’m clean and sober.”

Wesley, a heroin user from Brooklyn, told a story that’s all too common: drug abuse led him to stay on the streets for almost a year. Eventually, a relapse led him to treatment.

“At that time in my life, I was in need of some love and some real care,” he recalled. “So I thank God for the people who are on the front lines of withdrawal who paved the way and gave me the opportunity to give myself a chance. My favorite part, although it was hard for me, was to take an opportunity to give my growth some consideration. I’ve gained some tools, some insight, some awareness to be able to not misplace hostility on people who have nothing to do with what is going on inside my head. I’m not scared because I’ve been prepared for the inevitable, and that is to take back my life.”

“Now I’m ready to move on with my life,” he said. “I’m ready to be a productive member of society and take back a life that I so irresponsibly threw away. I felt like I was leaving home [when I graduated]. I felt like I was leaving my family. Those people have literally become my family. They know more about me than my own family. I thought I could never be honest in my life and let someone know what is truly going on with me. They prepared me, and they gave me my self-esteem back. They loved me more than I hated myself, and helped me to see that there is value, meaning, and purpose in my life. And today, I have what it takes. I have a new life, and I have the tools to proceed with that new life.”

Everybody has a different story about how they got to the point where they needed to seek treatment, but the common thread is that everyone who shares these stories makes peace with who they are, is able to leave the past in the past, and looks forward to a better life.